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Teaching in Arusha

Patandi Teacher’s College

Global warming due to an accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is the major cause of climate change . It is a cause of extreme weather events namely droughts, hurricanes and floods . It also causes rising sea levels. Climate change has adversely impacted indigenous communities around the world. It also causes food insecurity, disease outbreaks leading increased levels of poverty. Indigenous communities suffer the most. The Masai pastorists of Eastern Africa have suffered severely in this aspect. They live on fragile semi-arid rangelands where they graze and water their livestock. Rangeland productivity is dependent on rainfall whose patterns and reliability have been disrupted by climate change. Recurrent droughts is now common which in turn reduces grazing and water supply thereby reducing livestock productivity in terms of milk and meat production. Droughts also cause high livestock mortality. The reduced production of meat and milk upon which the Masai depend leads to food insufficiency. One strategy of combating such a reduction of grazing and water resources among the pastoral areas is integrating conservation and pastoralism. The area around Essimingor mountain in northern Tanzania is used by local Masai who use the mountain for grazing especially during the dry season. During the dry season the area is burnt thereby diminishing the available grazing and reducing forest cover. In addition to impact of climate change, some of the land around the mountain is being grabbed by outsiders thereby diminishing the available grazing areas for the Masai. It is proposed that a program be developed to support the Masai in integrating conservation and pastoralism for mitigating the impact of climate change. For any conservation activity to succeed, it must be integrated with pastoral livestock production. It is the entry point for any development activity in Masailand. Support to livestock gains the confidence of the Masai. No development activity can succeed without involving livestock. To the Masai, livestock is life

Haradali School

Haradali is an English Medium school which was established in 2005 and officially registered in 2008. It started with a wooden house as the only classroom, three teachers and 31 students. But it grew quickly and already has almost 900 pupils and 65 staff members. Haradali is based on Christian ethics, but they welcome children from every cultural background and religion.It is both a pre- and a primary school and the teachers prepare a progressive book for each child which covers his or her academic information. Three school busses transport every day all kids who live too far from school to walk. Some of the kids are street kids,orphans or vulnerable children.

Maasai School Meserani

The Maasai School is located in the Anglican Church in Meserani, Arusha. The pre-school started in April 2011 with 70 pupils. Right now about 50 pupils are taught there, but not every day all of them can come to class because of different challenges. Some of the children even have to walk up to 5 km from home to school! Two teachers and one cook are occupied here, but volunteers from all over the world help a lot. Most of the kids only have one meal per day (in school they get Uji) and different health problems, like eye or skin diseases. So the teachers don’t just teach them, but they also look after the children and their health. Right now a new school building is in process to be built with separated classrooms, because teaching different classes in the church makes it sometimes hard for the kids to concentrate (eg. they turn around and see what the kids of other classes are learning). The children in the school don’t have uniforms and there is no agriculture around which could provide additional food.

Patandi Teacher’s College

Patandi Teacher’s College for Special Needs Education is the only college of its kind in Tanzania. It started training specialist teachers in 1996. Now it has certificate level studies and higher awards. Besides being a teacher’s college, they offer audiometric tests, sign language training, sports projects for people with disabilities and much more. Volunteers can decide whether they want to be placed at the teacher’s college itself or at the Patandi Primary School, where the teachers are doing their practical studies and educate children with special needs.

St. Margaret’s Academy

St. Margaret’s Academy has grown from three students learning in the private house of Mama Tesha to over 450 students in three schools. The students benefit from solar lights and computers which integrate technology into the classrooms. The vision of the school is to educate AIDS orphans and children living with economic challenges. 225 of the students are orphans or underprivileged children and some are HIV positive. Despite vast challenges, the school is ranked one of the top in the country.
  • Teaching in Arusha
  • Arusha Classroom
  • Arusha Classroom
  • Teaching in Arusha
  • Arusha Classroom
  • Arusha Classroom